Naturism Teaches

I often refer to naturism as a hobby rather than a lifestyle. It is something I genuinely cherish. I always have, always will. It’s part of me, an important part. But it doesn’t guide my life. There are many things that are more important. But likewise, there are things that are less important to me. If that makes me less of a naturist to some, so be it. I know who I am and what matters to me.

I have to say though, I know for certain that I am a better person today as a result of being a naturist. It has definitely changed me and helped me grow. There are two areas specifically, where I see this most prominently, body image and acceptance.

When I say body image, I’m not talking about my own. Well, that too I suppose. But I’m talking about others. I’ve definitely come to see beauty in other bodies where I might not have when I was younger. The phrase “all bodies are beautiful” is the truth, and naturism teaches that. What I would have mocked before, I now accept, and even celebrate. I’m definitely less judgmental and critical. It doesn’t mean I don’t value health and fitness. I do. But I can now see beauty, confidence, and elegance in all.

The first time I saw a woman topless I was on a beach in Spain with a group of non-naturist friends. I hadn’t noticed her at first but one of my friends did. She was an older mildly-overweight German woman. The dichotomy between our reactions to seeing her, my friends vs mine, was significant. They went on and on about how no one wants to see that, she should put something on, they couldn’t unsee what they saw, etc…. It was all about how her toplessness impacted them. There were no thoughts about her, her thoughts, motives, feelings about what being topless meant to her.

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Naturism appreciates all shapes, sizes, and ages.  It’s fun for all!

I on the other hand was struck with her beauty. Not just physically, but how she carried herself — supremely confident and content. She knew exactly what she was doing. How these pasty white Americans felt about it was nowhere in the equation. I was impressed.

We saw many topless women on the beach that day and the response was always the same. If she was young, fit, and pert….she got positive comments. Otherwise, it was more of the same. It was sad to see. I wasn’t sure why they felt obliged to pass judgement on these women and their bodies at all. But they did. I had finally had enough and had to point out to them that they weren’t exactly ready for the cover of GQ themselves and they should keep their judgements to themselves. But…they didn’t get it. Too many years of conditioning perhaps.

But this highlighted to me that I was different. My response was different. Sure, I liked to see a pretty naked girl as much as the next guy. But I wasn’t so blind that I couldn’t see beauty in other body types and sizes. I can remember that moment and that German woman like it was yesterday. It was a seminal moment in my naturist evolution and maturing. I remember her fondly.

The other area where naturism has helped me grow is acceptance, specifically of my fellow nudist men. Society discourages men from admitting the beauty in the nude male in any way. You just never hear young men say that another man is good looking. The scourge of homophobia prevents it. To see that accentuated tenfold, witness men’s reaction to other nude men. “Gross, oh my god, sausage party, who wants to see that” they’ll yell as they avert their gaze.

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Nudity, male or female, is beautiful

Naturism taught me that male nudity is just as beautiful as female nudity, for the same reasons. I simply find nudity beautiful. I don’t worry about how that acceptance impacts my sexuality, because it doesn’t. I can see a nude man and appreciate a beautiful strong penis just as I can see a nude woman, and appreciate beautiful breasts. It’s the nudity that is beautiful. Their sex is immaterial.

So naturism may be a hobby in many ways, but it’s an important ingredient that makes me, me. In addition to providing me years of happiness and fun, its made me wiser and more accepting. I’m not sure who’d I be without it. Glad I don’t have to find out.

What do you think?  What has naturism taught you?  Leave a comment.  

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5 thoughts on “Naturism Teaches

  1. Pingback: The Male | Naturist Thoughts

  2. I can’t disagree with what you say, but I think you have overlooked what I think is a very important aspect of our preferred lifestyle.

    For most of us becoming involved in naturism meant taking a giant step outside our personal comfort zones. Removing your clothes in public the first time can be very difficult, but all of us who have done so quickly realized that there really was nothing to fear. Nothing bad happened, there was no shame or embarrassment, no one paid any attention, and our world was unchanged.

    In retrospect we also realized that stepping outside our comfort zones is not really as scary as we had imagined. I’m sure the experience of being nude in public has emboldened many to do other things which they had previously been reluctant to do.

    Obviously naturism is very liberating, the feeling of being free of your garments is one of the major incentives of naturism, but it is also very empowering, we all have conquered an irrational fear.

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    • Good points all. I’ve always felt that the true “first time” for any naturist is the day they came to accept and embrace their love of being nude. As you say, it is a leap. To go against societal norms and see past the negative claims and embrace what you know in your heart to be true, that naturism is a wonderful thing, takes courage and perseverance.

      I talked about this in one of my earlier entries entitled “It’s ok….really”.

      That’s for the read and the comment!

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  3. Pingback: Naturism as a Brilliant but Subtle Teacher — What it Taught Me | Nudie News

  4. Wow, you’ve been hacking my mind! Only thing I’ll add is the courage I admire when someone has put themselves out there for others to see both their physical flaws (in some cases battle of life scars) and those parts which society has ordained as not acceptable for public consumption.

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